What are?

VECTOR & RASTER:

What’s the difference?

 

 

This small guide will outline the differences in artwork formats and how they will affect the final print outcome.

The main difference between vector and raster graphics is that raster graphics are composed of pixels, while vector graphics are composed of paths.

Vector art is the ideal file for type and logos, vector files have sharp and defined lines and can easily be resized or go through colour changes without affecting the resolution of the artwork. Some of the most common vector files are created in Adobe Illustrator or CorelDraw.

Raster graphics are made from pixels of various colours, together, these pixels form an image. Raster graphics cannot be used for artwork, as pixel sizes increase when an artwork is enlarged. This then creates a “blocky” effect, just as you can see below.

Because vector graphics are not made of pixels, the images can be scaled to be very large without losing quality.  Therefore, logos and other designs are typically created in vector format – the quality will look the same on a business card as it will on a billboard.

 

 

Unfortunately, JPEG files saved in an EPS format can’t be used. Once a file has been in a JPEG format, it is not possible to revert that process. This also goes for any JPEG’s embedded into a vector file. Unless the original file is in complete vector format, artwork saved as raster files will typically need to be redrawn.

When supplying artwork, you should ensure all fonts are converted to outlines, this helps ensure all fonts carry over without any corruption. It is also highly recommended the Font Names and PMS Colours are supplied along with the artwork files.

ARTWORK GUIDELINES

To ensure your artwork fits all the previously highlighted criteria’s, we recommend following the below guidelines for vector art.

 

  • Ensure your fonts are turned into ‘Outlines’ in Illustrator or ‘Export as Curves’ when using CorelDraw. This will turn your fonts into vector and ensure there is no corruption when the file is shared.
  • Fonts that have not been outlined or exported as curves will not print properly. Fonts, spacing, and/or shaping often changes when a file is shared between systems if this step is not taken.
  • We recommend using CorelDraw or Adobe Illustrator to create your art. These files should be saved as EPS (Encapsulated PostScript) files.
  • Art must be at 100% size.
  • Scans and/or JPEG’s saved as EPS files cannot be used. Artwork in this format will typically need to be redrawn.

There are several different formats and files that you will come across during the artwork process. Below are some guidelines regarding these files and formats.

PHOTOSHOP:

Minimum resolution is 300dpi, size should be at 100%. Please save your file as CMYK, Tiff, or EPS.

ILLUSTRATOR:

Text to be converted to outlines/curves so we have the correct font. Placed images to be either embedded or supplied as separate files.

COREL DRAW:

Text to be converted to curves so we have the correct font.

 

PDF:

Original files are preferred, but artwork can be supplied in a PDF format. Images must be high resolution (300dpi) when placed at 100%, and all text should be converted to outlines. Images must be embedded in the PDF.

FONTS:

Any fonts used must be supplied or converted outlines/curves to avoid font problems.

EMBROIDERY:

Artwork for embroidery can be a high-quality JPEG file or an Illustrator EPS file with fonts converted to outlines.

 

VECTOR & RASTER:

What’s the difference?

 

 

This small guide will outline the differences in artwork formats and how they will affect the final print outcome.

The main difference between vector and raster graphics is that raster graphics are composed of pixels, while vector graphics are composed of paths.

Vector art is the ideal file for type and logos, vector files have sharp and defined lines and can easily be resized or go through colour changes without affecting the resolution of the artwork. Some of the most common vector files are created in Adobe Illustrator or CorelDraw.

Raster graphics are made from pixels of various colours, together, these pixels form an image. Raster graphics cannot be used for artwork, as pixel sizes increase when an artwork is enlarged. This then creates a “blocky” effect, just as you can see below.

Because vector graphics are not made of pixels, the images can be scaled to be very large without losing quality.  Therefore, logos and other designs are typically created in vector format – the quality will look the same on a business card as it will on a billboard.

 

 

Unfortunately, JPEG files saved in an EPS format can’t be used. Once a file has been in a JPEG format, it is not possible to revert that process. This also goes for any JPEG’s embedded into a vector file. Unless the original file is in complete vector format, artwork saved as raster files will typically need to be redrawn.

When supplying artwork, you should ensure all fonts are converted to outlines, this helps ensure all fonts carry over without any corruption. It is also highly recommended the Font Names and PMS Colours are supplied along with the artwork files.

ARTWORK GUIDELINES

To ensure your artwork fits all the previously highlighted criteria’s, we recommend following the below guidelines for vector art.

 

  • Ensure your fonts are turned into ‘Outlines’ in Illustrator or ‘Export as Curves’ when using CorelDraw. This will turn your fonts into vector and ensure there is no corruption when the file is shared.
  • Fonts that have not been outlined or exported as curves will not print properly. Fonts, spacing, and/or shaping often changes when a file is shared between systems if this step is not taken.
  • We recommend using CorelDraw or Adobe Illustrator to create your art. These files should be saved as EPS (Encapsulated PostScript) files.
  • Art must be at 100% size.
  • Scans and/or JPEG’s saved as EPS files cannot be used. Artwork in this format will typically need to be redrawn.

There are several different formats and files that you will come across during the artwork process. Below are some guidelines regarding these files and formats.

PHOTOSHOP:

Minimum resolution is 300dpi, size should be at 100%. Please save your file as CMYK, Tiff, or EPS.

ILLUSTRATOR:

Text to be converted to outlines/curves so we have the correct font. Placed images to be either embedded or supplied as separate files.

COREL DRAW:

Text to be converted to curves so we have the correct font.

 

PDF:

Original files are preferred, but artwork can be supplied in a PDF format. Images must be high resolution (300dpi) when placed at 100%, and all text should be converted to outlines. Images must be embedded in the PDF.

FONTS:

Any fonts used must be supplied or converted outlines/curves to avoid font problems.

EMBROIDERY:

Artwork for embroidery can be a high-quality JPEG file or an Illustrator EPS file with fonts converted to outlines.